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The State of Advertising report

Performance wins advertiser confidence as awareness gains mixed reviews, says WFA research.

Press release June 18, 2019

The State of Advertising, launched on June 18 at the Cannes Advertising Festival with the help of The Economist Group, reveals that while 30% believe effectiveness of performance has “increased dramatically” over the last five years, just 8% said the same for the top funnel.

Overall, a huge 72% of respondents said lower purchase funnel messages had improved on effectiveness over the last five years but only 43% said the same about ‘top funnel’ performance and 37% of those questioned said effectiveness had declined.

Despite this, most advertisers are continuing to focus their investment on awareness. Spend is focused on ‘top of the funnel’ activities for most respondents, with 55% saying most of their investment was going on activity designed to promote brand awareness. Thirty-one per cent were investing evenly between awareness and lower funnel performance with 7% investing mostly in performance messages and channels.

The results are based on an online survey of WFA members conducted in June 2019. More than 100 individuals responded from 70 companies across 15 categories, including consumer packaged goods, automotive, food, alcohol, tech and finance. Collectively, respondent companies spend roughly $115bn on media and marketing annually.

Increased investment in advertising, however, wasn’t automatically improving performance, with those who felt ad effectiveness was in decline blaming clutter (63%), the increasing ease of ad avoidance (53%), declining reach (42%) and declining trust in advertising (39%).

To overcome these challenges, respondents were focusing investment in eCommerce, programmatic, POS and offline advertising. eCommerce was cited as top priority by 28% of respondents with a further 30% saying it was a high priority while programmatic – covering search, social and display – was named as a top priority by 26% and as a high priority by a significant 47% of respondents.

Future priorities included areas currently attracting a lot of attention – IOT, voice, VR, AR. The three-year timeline highlighted the ongoing importance of data and programmatic as well as the rising importance of influencer marketing. Fifty percent of respondents said data was an area that would increase significantly, with programmatic in second scoring 27% on the same measure and influencer marketing attracting support from 11%.

Conversely, big advertisers seem to reject the current hysteria around the scale of the move to in-housing. They cited only one area where they would in-house more than outsource, low-cost, fast creative executions. Other areas likely to be affected by in-housing included short-form content marketing and influencer marketing.

Agencies are likely to benefit from increased spending in areas such as traditional media buying where 45% expect to spend significantly more and 30% to spend somewhat more in the next 12 months. Other areas that are also likely to be less impacted by in-housing include big ticket creativity, traditional media planning, creative strategy and programmatic search, all of which had over 50% of respondents predicting they would spend more externally.

Finally, respondents also highlighted their vision for the next five years:

  • Ads need for reciprocity: Seventy-seven percent supported the statement “in the future advertising will need to involve a value exchange/reciprocity”.

  • DTC brands to inspire: The second most popular statement was “direct to consumer brands will inspire the big traditional advertisers to find new and better ways of connecting with their audiences”. Thirty-four per cent strongly agreed and 39% somewhat agreed.

  • Traditional ads are here to stay: Respondents largely disagreed with the premise that in five years’ time there will be no traditional advertising. Just 8% strongly agreed with the statement that: “looking ahead five years, I can imagine a world without traditional advertising formats”. Twenty-eight per cent strongly disagreed and thirty-four per cent somewhat disagreed.

  • Marketers obsessed with their own problems: Sixty-seven percent agreed that the industry had become too obsessed with its own problems to the detriment of putting the consumer first,

  • Brand purpose frequently lacks authenticity: Sixty-five per cent agreed with the statement that most examples of brand purpose fail to resonate with the consumer as they lack authenticity, with 19% strongly agreeing.

    Read more: https://bit.ly/2Yxy21y

Whether it’s the influence of the media, or public demonstrations against climate change, the impact of plastic on the environment has captured the attention of consumers worldwide.  The fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry is facing its own battle with plastic, and public outcry has led to a response from some of the most prominent brands around the world. Supermarket chains have done away with single-use plastic bags, while many manufacturers have taken steps to reduce or remove plastic packaging at point of sale or in their supply chain.  Our research found that nearly half (48%) of all consumers worldwide expect manufacturers to take the lead, saying they have the most responsibility to act on these issues. And making changes to account for this is clearly a matter of ‘when’, rather than ‘if’, for all businesses.  But, how much do shoppers really care? Are their criticisms and wishes reflected in their own purchase behaviour? Which regions, countries and demographics are most engaged with reducing their plastic consumption? Where does the opportunity lie for retailers and manufacturers?  Kantar, in collaboration with Europanel and GfK, has surveyed more than 65,000 people in 24 countries— exploring how they feel about the use of plastics by FMCG companies. What makes this study unique is our ability to compare their answers with our panelists’ real purchase behaviour, to truly understand how they change their shopping baskets and their relationship with the brands they are choosing.  That said, retailers and manufacturers can’t expect consumers to jump to their brand purely for their green credentials— and being ‘green’ or sustainable means different things in different markets. By understanding the ‘green gap’ between those who say they care, and those that actually do something about it, we can unlock the opportunities of environmental concern—and help brands play an important role in shaping our future planet.  Read More: https://bit.ly/2IymYeC

Whether it’s the influence of the media, or public demonstrations against climate change, the impact of plastic on the environment has captured the attention of consumers worldwide.

The fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry is facing its own battle with plastic, and public outcry has led to a response from some of the most prominent brands around the world. Supermarket chains have done away with single-use plastic bags, while many manufacturers have taken steps to reduce or remove plastic packaging at point of sale or in their supply chain.

Our research found that nearly half (48%) of all consumers worldwide expect manufacturers to take the lead, saying they have the most responsibility to act on these issues. And making changes to account for this is clearly a matter of ‘when’, rather than ‘if’, for all businesses.

But, how much do shoppers really care? Are their criticisms and wishes reflected in their own purchase behaviour? Which regions, countries and demographics are most engaged with reducing their plastic consumption? Where does the opportunity lie for retailers and manufacturers?

Kantar, in collaboration with Europanel and GfK, has surveyed more than 65,000 people in 24 countries— exploring how they feel about the use of plastics by FMCG companies. What makes this study unique is our ability to compare their answers with our panelists’ real purchase behaviour, to truly understand how they change their shopping baskets and their relationship with the brands they are choosing.

That said, retailers and manufacturers can’t expect consumers to jump to their brand purely for their green credentials— and being ‘green’ or sustainable means different things in different markets. By understanding the ‘green gap’ between those who say they care, and those that actually do something about it, we can unlock the opportunities of environmental concern—and help brands play an important role in shaping our future planet.

Read More: https://bit.ly/2IymYeC